New work in progress

Even though it may have started out being a snowy day here in the East, the snow broke through the clouds and gave beautiful light for starting a new painting today.

It took quite a while to get the sketch on the paper, so I was anxious to at least start getting some paint to the paper.   By mid to late afternoon I was happy to start, even though my assistant “cough-cough, Toaster” tried to get in the water.

Working with Winsor & Newton watercolors on 300 cold pressed paper.

So far I’ve used 10 colors just on these two gems and I will still go back to them!

jewelsid

This could take awhile…….

Meanwhile, any suggestions for a name for this painting?

Nixie getting more layers

Working on getting some more layers added to this commission piece.  Gradually adding more layers of color.  This session I used cadmium yellow, burnt sienna, raw umber, burnt sienna, French ultramarine blue, payne’s gray, raw sienna, burnt umber, indigo, cadmium orange, permanent mauve, winsor violet, and a various mixture of some of those colors.  Not in that particular order, btw, I’m just trying to remember all the colors I used today to tell you, lol. Light was great for painting today, but time to call it a day.  Have a great rest of the weekend everybody!

~ Denise ~

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Work in progress – DSJonesStudio.com

Paper, paper, paper – (not to be confused with location, location location)

When beginning to paint in watercolor you might be limited by choices of watercolor supplies available to you, or be overwhelmed by the choices depending on where you shop or live (I’m speaking from experience here).

Early on I got some great advice from a talented watercolor instructor to use the best supplies that I could afford.

I did a great job on my paints and brushes, however, I needed to do some adjusting on my paper.  I’m so glad I did!

For my watercolor paper when I first started I went to my local craft supply store and picked up a packet of 140 lb cold pressed watercolor paper.  I have tried two different brands over the years just to compare quality.

Paper, paper, paper

If I had to give a tip for watercolor painting it would be choose your paper wisely.

Followed closely by your paints, brushes, etc.  I just had to add that.  They are so important too in quality.  I couldn’t help myself.  Sigh.

My all time favorite paper to paint on is Fabriano 300 lb cold pressed.  I’ve painted on their 140 and 300 lb.  I still prefer the 300 lb the best.

I started a little painting exercise this afternoon on both a store brand 140 lb paper and my favorite 300 lb paper.  I used the same paint colors, washes, and method of laying down the paint.  I wanted you to see how just using the different quality of paper can change the overall painting.  I won’t be finishing the store paper one btw.   🙂

Painting in watercolor is exciting and surprising when the color moves and travels across the paper the way it is supposed to.  If you are having trouble or maybe wondering about a painting, take a look at your supplies.  Especially your watercolor paper.  Maybe you might want to try a new one!

I’m always looking at what other artists are doing and what paints and supplies they use.  That’s what sparks the creative juices!

What tip would you give someone starting out in watercolor?  Or, if you are just starting, what is something that you are wondering about?

Comment below on the blog, or if you are following me on Facebook, add a comment there!

Thanks for stopping by!

Denise

 

 

Sticking to the plan.

Picking up the paint brushes the last two days I reminded myself to stick with the plan. That being, I reminded myself not to do things I might usually do out of habit and to try new things. Like use big brushes and keep in loose. 

This picture shows the layers of colors added and the progress from the last post. 


This picture shows more layers of color and additional areas that I’m beginning to start the first wash of colors on. This is where I left off for the day and I will be mulling it over in my head about what colors and what I’ll be adding when I paint next. 


Thanks for stopping by!

Stepping Out Of Comfort Zones

Sometimes we get stuck doing things the same way. That can have pros and cons. While there are certain things that need to be done a certain way to produce the same result each time, there are also times when one can experiment to see what develops.  Especially when you want to spark some creative juices. 

You might remember me mention the gift of watercolor classes years ago from my husband that reignited my painting.  Last week I was thinking about that class and remembering some things. Two things in particular: 

  • Barbie, the instructor, telling us to paint on a larger scale
  • Barbara, a fellow classmate, saying “it’s only paper” when  she wouldn’t be especially fond of her project, but would quickly start another painting ready to try new things

I was thinking about this because I was trying to decide what I wanted to paint. I just felt stuck. I thought I knew what I wanted to paint, however, I didn’t want to go about it the same way. 

Lately I’ve be painting smaller paintings. I can finish one faster (if I’m not my own worse critic and  become a perfectionist about it) and can move on to the next project, as the size allows to have multiple projects started at once. 

Usually I spend an hour or so getting a sketch on the paper prior to painting, depending on the size of the painting. I’ve been known to take longer.  I also spend time thinking about the colors I want to use and write them down in a notebook so I don’t forget for the painting.   If there is a painting that I previously did that I think I might like to use similar colors, I will go back and look at my notes from that painting.  All this takes time, and thought.  

Soooo, all that being said. I decided to switch it up and let you in on how it’s going. 

I decided to paint on a half sheet paper (15×22), hardly sketch at all (spent 5 minutes), tape paper in a different way (back instead of edges) and paint as loosely as possible. 

The first wash of color is always the stage that is the ugliest and ackward. You just have to remember this is a work in progress, tell yourself that over and over, and push on. 


After it dries and you can add a little more color you start to feel the painting emerge. 


Since the painting is at this point, and I’m waiting for it to dry some, I thought I’d post some pictures and let you know what is happening at the Studio. I’ll do my best to keep you posted with pictures along the way. 

Thanks for stopping by!